"Our animals shepherd us through certain eras of ourlives. When we are ready to turn the corner and make it on our own...they let us go." Anonymous
  • feline mammary
    tumours
  • pathogenesis of canine mammary tumors
  • feline
    mammary tumors
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  • Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 2003 May;33(3):573-96. : Canine mammary gland tumors.
    Sorenmo K.
    University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Clinical Studies, 3900 Delancey Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
    karins@vet.upenn.edu

    The National Consensus Group recommends that all women with tumors larger than 1 cm be offered chemotherapy regardless of tumor histology of lymph node status. This recommendation is to ensure that everyone at risk for failing, even though the risk may be low in women with relatively small tumors and favorable histology, has a choice and receives the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. This type of treatment recommendation may also be made in dogs based on recognized, well-accepted prognostic factors such as tumor size, stage, type, and histologic differentiation. Based on the limited clinical information available in veterinary medicine, the drugs that are effective in human breast cancer, such as cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin, may also have a role in the treatment of malignant mammary gland tumors in dogs. Randomized prospective studies are needed, however, to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy in dogs with high-risk mammary gland tumors and to determine which drugs and protocols are the most efficacious. Until such studies are performed, the treatment of canine mammary gland tumors will be based on the individual oncologist's understanding of tumor biology, experience, interpretation of the available studies, and a little bit of gut-feeling. Table 2 is a proposal for treatment guidelines for malignant canine mammary gland tumors according to established prognostic factors, results from published veterinary studies, and current recommendations for breast cancer treatment in women
  • J Vet Intern Med. 2003 Jan-Feb;17(1):102-6. : Influence of host factors on survival in dogs with malignant mammary gland tumors.
    Philibert JC, Snyder PW, Glickman N, Glickman LT, Knapp DW, Waters DJ.
    Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN, USA.
    jphilibert@nevog.com

    The purpose of our study was to determine if specific host factors, such as age at diagnosis, obesity, and hormone status, influence the prognosis of canine mammary gland carcinomas and to confirm if previously reported risk factors (ie, histologic subtype, tumor size, and World Health Organization [WHO] stage) were important in a large series of affected dogs. Ninety-nine female dogs with mammary gland carcinomas, no previous therapy, an excisional biopsy, and known cause of death were studied. No significant association with survival was noted for age at diagnosis (chronologic or physiologic), obesity, or hormone status (ie, spayed versus intact, regardless of time of being spayed). Of the tumor factors analyzed, the histologic subtype anaplastic carcinoma (P = .02), WHO stage I (P = .01), evidence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis (P = .004), and tumor size of 3 cm or smaller (P = .005) all significantly influenced survival. Dogs that were classified as having tumor-related mortality had a shorter postoperative survival compared to dogs that died of other causes (14 months versus 23 months; P = .03). In conclusion, histologic subtype, WHO stage, and tumor size remain important prognostic factors in canine mammary gland tumors. Further study of other prognostic factors is needed to determine which tumors are adequately addressed with local therapy only and which dogs may require adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy.
  • Fat soluable vitamins A,D,E,K
  • antioxidant group
  • VITAMINS AND COFACTORS
  • fundamentals of nutrition

  • melatonin cancer treatment-some research

    Mammary tumors
    Canine mammary tumors seem to have risk of 50 percent malignancy whereas felines have over 85 percent chance risk. For cats, it seems as if the size of tumor is the most telling sign of prognosis...About 25 out of 100,000 cats come down with mammary cancer. Far cry from 1 in every 9 women coming down with breast cancer. The jury is still out if spaying decreases risk of mammary cancer in cats. Studies appear to show that neutering doesn't help decrease risk once there is a tumor seems to be a group consensus. There is some consensus that the feline tumors are usually advanced by time they are seen by vets..I have repeatedly read that the tumors had been present for about five months. Again consensus for cats seems the tumors are usually seen in cats between the age of 10-12. A new friend on felinecancer said one of her companions developed it at seven months old! I had read earliest was nine months old..just shows you. Yuki will be three this month..Sept. Yuki had a cyst..My vet said he hasn't seen a cyst like that in kitty cats that were spayed before six months. We waited to spay Yuki until she was bigger..rats.
    So far I haven't found information on using melatonin on felines with cancer or to help prevent it. Haven't found references in using CLA,Conjugated linoleic acid,"Conjugated linoleic acid is a fatty acid found in trace amounts in meats and dairy products; it is synthesized by bacteria in the rumen of the source animals. Long-term studies have already shown that feeding CLA to rats cuts mammary tumor incidence in half. Other data indicate inhibition of skin and forestomach carcinogenesis".click here for abstract. Having found reference to increasing folic acid which might help in breast cancer in humans.
  • Influence of host factors on survival in dogs with malignant mammary gland tumors.
    Philibert JC, Snyder PW, Glickman N, Glickman LT, Knapp DW, Waters DJ.
    Dept of Vet Clin Sci, Purdue Univ School of Vet Med, West Lafayette, IN, USA.
    J Vet Intern Med 2003 Jan-Feb;17(1):102-6
    The purpose of our study was to determine if specific host factors, such as age at diagnosis, obesity, and hormone status, influence the prognosis of canine mammary gland carcinomas and to confirm if previously reported risk factors (ie, histologic subtype, tumor size, and World Health Organization [WHO] stage) were important in a large series of affected dogs. Ninety-nine female dogs with mammary gland carcinomas, no previous therapy, an excisional biopsy, and known cause of death were studied. No significant association with survival was noted for age at diagnosis (chronologic or physiologic), obesity, or hormone status (ie, spayed versus intact, regardless of time of being spayed). Of the tumor factors analyzed, the histologic subtype anaplastic carcinoma (P = .02), WHO stage I (P = .01), evidence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis (P = .004), and tumor size of 3 cm or smaller (P = .005) all significantly influenced survival. Dogs that were classified as having tumor-related mortality had a shorter postoperative survival compared to dogs that died of other causes (14 months versus 23 months; P = .03). In conclusion, histologic subtype, WHO stage, and tumor size remain important prognostic factors in canine mammary gland tumors. Further study of other prognostic factors is needed to determine which tumors are adequately addressed with local therapy only and which dogs may require adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy.
  • study showing that
    findings suggest that ovariohysterectomy when mammary tumours are removed does not have a significant effect on the progression of malignant disease, and that about one in four bitches with a benign mammary tumour is likely to develop a further tumour in another gland.
    Feline Mammary Tumors
    Re lactic acid and possible cancer fighting properties-plus raw versus cooked vegetables
    I was given permission by Suze F.to post it here
    Hi Toni, I'd love to hear what you come up with on your Internet search. Here is a quote from CJ Puotinen's "The Encyclopedia of Natural Pet Care, "In his book "How to Fight Cancer and Win," William L. Fischer describes the importance of saurkraut and other lactic acid fermented foods as a support therapy in human cancer prevention and treatment. Those are fresh, raw, unpasteurized natural pickels, made without vinegar and with a minimum of salt, which are, Fischer explained, an excellent bowel tonic; they improve digestion, which in cancer patients is often compromised by a lack of hydrochloric acid and enzymes, and are themselves rich in easily assimilated nutrients. Lactic acid maintains beneficial intestinal flora while helping to eliminate harmful bacteria. According to German physician and scientist Johannes Kuhl, M.D., Ph.D., lactic acid foods are "hostile" to cancer. "No other full-value diet will do the job [of reducing cancer cases]," he wrote." It sounds like this process may more closely replicate the "pre-digested" plant material in a prey's stomach and intestines than cooked veggies, as you mentioned. However, I disagree that wolves and or dogs' ancestors didn't eat raw plant materials albeit, I believe, in small amounts. No one seems to agree how much raw plant material they ate but they ate some as do many modern day dogs if the owner allows it. Juliette de Bairacli Levy writes in "The Complete Herbal Handbook For the Dog and Cat," "The dog is no true vegetable eater, taking only what it gets from the contents of the intestines of the prey which it kills, and in very limited amounts, direct from various grasses, berries and mosses, which it seeks out for itself. Many dogs have completely lost their instinct for the seeking-out of herbs; only for that admirable, intestinal cleansing herb, couch grass (Agropyrum repens) , do dogs seem to retain their herb eating instinct..." (p.32) She does emphasize that dogs seek herbs more for medicinal purposes than for nutritional ones. Maybe we don't really differ on this point, I just think they do eat some raw plant material although a very small ratio compared to meat consumption. I do agree that dogs' ancestors probably didn't eat much raw cabbage or turnip unless these agriculturally-raised veggies have wild counterparts somewhere in the world where dogs' ancestors lived. Hmmm.... I'm beginning to think I overfeed veggies....I give my two 10 lb. dogs about 3 Tbs. each per day. Sometimes a little more, sometimes a little less. This is another issue I've been pondering along with the digestion issue....